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Current Book Awards & Nominees: 2019
    The 2019 National Book Award
    The National Book Award for Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People's Literature
    is presented by the National Book Foundation in partnership with Vanity Fair.
    The longlist of 10 nominees in each category was announced on Friday, September 20, 2019.
    The shortlist of 5 finalists in each category was announced on Tuesday, October 8, 2019. (*FINALIST*)
    The awards were presented to the winners on Wednesday, November 20, 2019. (*** WINNER ***)

    [more...]

  • 2019 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR FICTION:
    Taffy Brodesser-Akner, Fleishman Is in Trouble (Penguin Random House)
    Susan Choi, Trust Exercise (Macmillan) *FINALIST* *** WINNER ***
    Kali Fajardo-Anstine, Sabrina & Corina: Stories (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Marlon James, Black Leopard, Red Wolf (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Laila Lalami, The Other Americans (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Kimberly King Parsons, Black Light: Stories (Penguin Random House)
    Helen Phillips, The Need Simon & Schuster
    Julia Phillips, Disappearing Earth (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Ocean Vuong, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous (Penguin Random House)
    Colson Whitehead, The Nickel Boys (Penguin Random House)

  • 2019 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR NONFICTION:
    Hanif Abdurraqib, Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest (University of Texas Press)
    Sarah M. Broom, The Yellow House (Grove Atlantic) *FINALIST* *** WINNER ***
    Tressie McMillan Cottom, Thick: And Other Essays (The New Press) *FINALIST*
    Carolyn Forché, What You Have Heard is True: A Memoir of Witness and Resistance (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Greg Grandin, The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America (Macmillan)
    Patrick Radden Keefe, Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland (Penguin Random House)
    Iliana Regan, Burn the Place: A Memoir (Agate Publishing)
    Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership (University of North Carolina Press)
    David Treuer, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Albert Woodfox with Leslie George, Solitary (Grove Atlantic) *FINALIST*

  • 2019 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR POETRY:
    Dan Beachy-Quick, Variations on Dawn and Dusk (Omnidawn Publishing)
    Jericho Brown, The Tradition (Copper Canyon Press) *FINALIST*
    Toi Derricotte, "I": New and Selected Poems (University of Pittsburgh Press) *FINALIST*
    Camonghne Felix, Build Yourself a Boat (Haymarket Books)
    Ilya Kaminsky, Deaf Republic (Graywolf Press) *FINALIST*
    Ariana Reines, A Sand Book (Tin House Books)
    Mary Ruefle, Dunce (Wave Books)
    Carmen Giménez Smith, Be Recorder (Graywolf Press) *FINALIST*
    Arthur Sze, Sight Lines (Copper Canyon Press) *FINALIST* *** WINNER ***
    Brian Teare, Doomstead Days (Nightboat Books)

  • 2019 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE'S LITERATURE:
    Kwame Alexander (illustrated by Kadir Nelson), The Undefeated (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
    Laurie Halse Anderson, SHOUT (Penguin Random House)
    Akwaeke Emezi, Pet (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Cynthia Kadohata (illustrated by Julia Kuo), A Place to Belong (Simon & Schuster)
    Jason Reynolds, Look Both Ways: A Tale Told in Ten Blocks (Simon & Schuster) *FINALIST*
    Randy Ribay, Patron Saints of Nothing (Penguin Random House) *FINALIST*
    Laura Ruby, Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All (HarperCollins) *FINALIST*
    Martin W. Sandler, 1919: The Year That Changed America (Bloomsbury) *FINALIST* *** WINNER ***
    Hal Schrieve, Out of Salem (Seven Stories Press)
    Colleen AF Venable and Ellen T. Crenshaw, Kiss Number 8 (Macmillan)



The 2019 Booker Prize
The Booker Prize is the world's most prestigious literary award. The prize promotes the finest in fiction by rewarding the very best novel of the year written in the English language.
[more...]

The 2019 Booker Prize judges unanimously flouted the rule against ties and have awarded this year's award to both Bernardine Evaristo for Girl, Woman, Other and to Margaret Atwood for The Testaments.



  • The 2019 longlist (best 13 titles) was announced Wednesday, July 24, 2019.
    • The Testaments by Margaret Atwood *** WINNER ***
    • Night Boat to Tangier by Kevin Barry
    • My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite
    • Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann
    • Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo *** WINNER ***
    • The Wall by John Lanchester
    • The Man Who Saw Everything by Deborah Levy
    • Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli
    • An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma
    • Lanny by Max Porter
    • Quichotte by Salman Rushdie
    • 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak
    • Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson
  • The 2019 shortlist (best 6 titles) was announced Tuesday, September 3, 2019.
    • The Testaments by Margaret Atwood
    • Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann
    • Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo
    • An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma
    • Quichotte by Salman Rushdie
    • 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak
  • The winner of the 2019 Man Booker Prize was announced Monday, October 14, 2019.

Nominees for the 2019 Booker Prize:


(Nan A. Talese/Random)
WINNER!
2019 BOOKER PRIZE WINNER
THE TESTAMENTS by Margaret Atwood
Before publication of The Testaments, Atwood said in a statement that she wanted her sequel to The Handmaid's Tale to explore parallels between her imaginary dystopia - in which women are treated as reproductive serfs - and the current political climate. She has accomplished all of that - and much more!
"Perhaps no other writer has managed her own phenomenon with so much grace and skill. The Testaments is Atwood at her best, in its mixture of generosity, insight and control. The prose is adroit, direct, beautifully turned. . . To read this book is to feel the world turning, as the unforeseeable shifts of the last few years reveal the same old themes. It is also a chance to see your own political life flash in front of your eyes, to remember how the world was 30 years ago and say: 'If she was right in 1985, she is more right today.'" - The Guardian (U.K.).
"A compelling sequel. . . contrived in a Dickensian sort of way with coincidences that reverberate with philosophical significance. Atwood’s sheer assurance as a storyteller makes for a fast, immersive narrative that's as propulsive as it is melodramatic." - The New York Times.
"A thriller, with a fast-paced plot featuring many entangled concealments and dramatic confrontations. Atwood's writing is at its incisive best throughout this novel. A pivotal mystery (who is the mole in Gilead who is helping the Mayday resistance movement?), a gripping plot, and a dramatic denouement. Atwood is not simply responding to our current anxieties, though she is clearly aware of what is on the collective mind. Her book is written to entertain, for that is a novelist’s business; but it is also her own testament, and a renewal of the warning of The Handmaid’s Tale." - The London Times (U.K.).
"Atwood responds to the challenge of our familiarity with The Handmaid's Tale by giving us the narrator we least expect. It's a brilliant strategic move that turns the world of Gilead inside out. That's the genius of Atwood’s creation. Atwood is far more focused on creating a brisk thriller than she is on exploring the perversity of systemic repression. . . the fact that Atwood keeps challenging such categories is all part of her extraordinary effort to resist the chains we place on each other. Praise be." - The Washington Post.

(Doubleday/Random)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
NIGHT BOAT TO TANGIER by Kevin Barry
Two aging criminals at the ends of their damage-filled careers share a nocturnal vigil that initiates an extraordinary journey back in time to excavate their history of violence, romance, and betrayal. Kevin Barry - one of the most striking and admired fiction writers at work today - delivers a darkly humorous and superbly melancholic melody of a novel.
"Barry's absurdist waiting-game invites obvious comparison with Samuel Beckett. However, this electrifying novel is stamped with Barry's signature. There is the ragged poetry of his prose, as compelling as ever, a rich seam of tragicomedy, quietly devastating scenes. . . When we finally get the whole dramatic picture, it is with reluctance that we take our leave of these flawed and fading men tormented by their ghosts and demons." - The National (U.K.).
"An emotionally crushing panorama of two friends gone wildly astray, punished by regret but with their grim solidarity intact. A devastatingly vivid portrayal of serious crime and its real consequences. . . Barry is a clairvoyant narrator of the male psyche and a consistent lyrical visionary. But what distinguishes this book beyond its humour, terror and beauty of description is its moral perception. This is a plunging spiritual immersion into the parlous souls of wrongful men." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"Barry is a writer of the first rate, and his prose is at turns lean and lyrical, but always precise. The characters' banter is wildly and inventively coarse, and something to behold. As far as bleak Irish fiction goes, this is black tar heroin." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.

(Biblioasis/IPS)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE *SHORTLIST*
DUCKS, NEWBURYPORT by Lucy Ellman
A profoundly ambitious book about what it's like to be alive in the 21st century. By turns a cozy domestic tale, a feminist rant, and (courtesy of a subplot involving a mountain lion) an adventure story, it's a terrifying, deeply funny, thoroughly original reinvention of the American novel.
"A remarkable portrait of a woman in contemporary America contemplating her own life and society's storm clouds, such as the Flint water crisis, gun violence, and the Trump presidency. The narrator is a fiercely protective mother trying to raise her children the only way she knows how, in a rapidly changing and hostile environment. Ellmann's work is challenging but undoubtedly brilliant." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
"Brings together elements from all Ellmann's previous books: her great love of lists; the endless references to popular culture; the roarings and forebodings and glorious meanderings. I could tell you the significance of the ducks of the title, but that would cheat you of one of the great pleasures of the novel. It's a book about a mother's love, but also about loss and grief, and anxiety dreams about Donald Trump, and despair about mass shootings. It is also a catalogue of life's many injuries and mishaps and of the simple joys and consolations of memory and imagination. A triumph." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"A long, free-association, run-on sentence coming from the overactive brain of a mother of four. The story that emerges from her riffs and ruminations is interrupted only by a tale about a mountain lion, which seems to have nothing to do with the main event until the two ingeniously merge. VERDICT: Is it worth the considerable time and effort required to get through 728 densely packed pages to journey into the mind of this funny and insanely loveable worrywart? Yes! It's a jaw-dropping miracle." - Library Journal *** starred review ***.

(Anchor/Random)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
2019 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION NOMINEE

MY SISTER, THE SERIAL KILLER by Oyinkan Braithwaite
A lethally elegant comic novel set in Nigeria about a woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends. Oyinkan Braithwaite's deliciously deadly debut is as fun as it is frightening.
"A bombshell of a book - sharp, explosive, hilarious. . . It's Lagos noir - pulpy, peppery and sinister, served up in a comic deadpan. This book is, above all, built to move, to hurtle forward - and it does so, dizzyingly. There's a seditious pleasure in its momentum. At a time when there are such wholesome and dull claims on fiction, there's a relief in encountering a novel faithful to art's first imperative: to catch and keep our attention. This scorpion-tailed little thriller leaves a sting you will remember." - The New York Times.
"A rich, dark debut. Evocative of the murderously eccentric Brewster sisters from the classic play and film Arsenic and Old Lace. Braithwaite doesn't mock the murders as comic fodder, and that's just one of the unexpected pleasures of her quirky novel. A clever, affecting examination of siblings bound by a secret with a body count." - The Boston Globe.
"Braithwaite's blazing debut is as sharp as a knife, bitingly funny and brilliantly executed, with not a single word out of place." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
"Darkly compelling. . . The prose is as deft, personal, and economic as it is evocative. Braithwaite combines the comparatively lighter tropes of Jane Austen with a dark tale of murder, familial complication, and moral compromise, and thereby redefines both tropes for a new generation. This is expert storytelling." - The Los Angeles Review of Books.

(Grove/Atlantic)
WINNER!
2019 BOOKER PRIZE WINNER
GIRL, WOMAN, OTHER by Bernardine Evaristo
In twelve chapters, twelve women move through the world in different decades. Their lives overlap, but their experiences, backgrounds and choices could not be more different. This is a glorious love song to black womanhood: celebratory, ever-dynamic and utterly irresistible.
"Each storyline brings the reader round to a position of empathy. The characters are flawed and complex. When each section ends, we leave with a new perspective. Evaristo's world is not idealised, but there is something uniquely beautiful about it. For many readers, it's not a familiar world. But that certainly doesn't mean it's not a world that is possible, and worth celebrating. Girl, Woman, Other is about struggle, but it is also about love, joy and imagination." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"Weaves through time and space with crackling originality." - Vogue Magazine.
"Evaristo's eighth book continues to expand and enhance our literary canon. A sparkling new novel that progresses in clever twists and turns to a surprise ending. . . The language is exuberant, bursting at the seams in delightful ways. A prose feast. . . The characters' moving tales of pain, joy and friendship are drawn from a wide range of backgrounds and heritages: African, Caribbean, European. This is a story for our times. . . This is the writer to read." - The New Statesman (U.K.).
"Girl, Woman, Other received half a Booker Prize, but it deserves all the glory. A breathtaking symphony of black women's voices, a clear-eyed survey of contemporary challenges that's nevertheless wonderfully life-affirming. . . Together, all these women present a cross-section that feels godlike in its scope and insight." - The Washington Post.

(Norton)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
THE WALL by John Lanchester
A concrete wall runs for thousands of miles around the borders of an unnamed island nation, closing it off completely from the outside world. Acclaimed British novelist John Lanchester delivers a taut and chilling dystopian novel that blends the most compelling issues of our time - rising waters, rising fear, rising political division - into a riveting story of love, trust, and survival.
"John Lanchester's new novel arrives at a moment in which the definition of a wall is a matter of national debate, and it actively invites such associations. Gripping. . . full of tense action and sudden reversals. Few readers will stop until they reach its final page." - The New York Times.
"Lanchester's view is unblinking, his prose assured: This is what happens when the sea rises, this is what happens when an outsider lands in a place where life has little meaning and the only certain things are the Wall, the cold, the water, and death. This is dystopian fiction done just right, with a scenario that's all too real." - Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
"An environmental fable that manages to be both disquieting and quite good fun at the same time. Lanchester reveals with slow, steady control the cruelties of his strange new world and then socks you with their philosophical implications. . . The Wall packs its punch by extrapolating a terrifying future from present trends. A signal achievement. . . Lanchester's talents as a novelist – his judicious blending of realism and metaphor and his mastery of narrative tension – have been put to estimable use. The result is a novel that ranks alongside Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake as a fictional meditation on what climate change may mean for the planet. The Wall is so unsettling precisely because it goes so effectively with the grain of contemporary fears." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"The Wall could be about many things, but its real power stems from the fact that it never collapses into straightforward metaphorical equivalence. It asks only to be read on its own terms: as an unsettling, compulsive and brilliant portrait of powerlessness." - Financial Times (U.K.).

(Bloomsbury/MPS)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
THE MAN WHO SAW EVERYTHING by Deborah Levy
On the eve of a trip to East Germany in 1988, Saul Adler, a young historian, poses for a photo at the crosswalk on Abbey Road made famous by a Beatles album cover and is hit by an oncoming car. The accident completely changes the trajectory of his narcissistic life. In her third Booker Prize nominated novel, Deborah Levy delivers a masterful story about the difficulty of seeing ourselves and others clearly and about the reinvention of history by people in power.
"Levy's sense of dramatic form is unerring, and her precise, dispassionate prose effortlessly summons people and landscapes." - The New Yorker.
"Elliptical, elusive and endlessly stimulating. . . packs an astonishing amount into 200 pages. . . a brilliantly constructed jigsaw puzzle of meaning that will leave readers wondering how much they can ever truly know." - The Washington Post.
"One of the most intellectually exciting writers in Britain today, has produced a caustically funny exploration of history, perception, the nature of political tyranny and how lovers can simultaneously charm and erase each other." - The New York Times.
"The twice Booker-shortlisted Levy is a genius author and she returns with an electrifying new novel that explores both what we see and what we miss until the past and present are staring directly at us." - The Sunday Times (U.K.).
"Complex in theme and symbol, this story packs an entire world - in fact, different versions of this world - into 200 pages. Each novel Man Booker finalist Deborah Levy writes comes nearer perfection. Reread The Man Who Saw Everything for the deep pleasure of it, but also to savor each scene's multiple meanings." - The New York Journal of Books.

(Bloomsbury/MPS)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
2019 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION NOMINEE

LOST CHILDREN ARCHIVE by Valeria Luiselli
What begins as the account of a family's road trip is overwhelmed by the reality of children at America's southern border trapped in detention centers. Luiselli's new novel is an astonishing feat of literary virtuosity taking us deep into the lives of one remarkable family as it probes the nature of justice and equality today.
"Daring, wholly original, brilliant. . . What Luiselli has pulled off here is a twist on the great American road trip novel, a book about alienation that chronicles fractures, divides, and estrangement - of both a family and a country. It's a remarkable feat of empathy and intellectuality that showcases Luiselli's ability to braid the political, historical, and personal while explicitly addressing the challenges of figuring out how to tell the very story she's telling. Luiselli is an extraordinary writer." - NPR.
"A mold-breaking new classic. The novel truly becomes novel again in Luiselli's hands - electric, elastic, alluring, new. The brilliance of the writing stirs rage and pity. . . Luiselli drives home just how much pain and sacrifice we are prepared to accept in the lives of others. She dramatizes what it takes for people to stare hard at their own families, to examine their complicity in other people's suffering." - The New York Times.
"As the novel rises to a ferocious climax, Luiselli thunderously, persuasively insists that reckoning with the border will make deep demands of both our intellectual and emotional reserves. A powerful border story, at once intellectual and heartfelt." - Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
"Engrossing, constantly surprising - a beguiling mixture of the real and the doubly invented; a passionately engaged book with intellectual amplitude and moral seriousness, and a beautiful, loving portrait of children and of the task of looking after them. It is a pleasure to be a part of the narrator's family; just as pleasurable is the access we gain to the narrator's mind - a comprehensive literary intelligence." - The New Yorker.

(Little Brown/Hachette)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE *SHORTLIST*
AN ORCHESTRA OF MINORITIES by Chigozie Obioma
Chinonso, a young Nigerian poultry farmer, will do anything to win the hand of his true love, Ndali, despite her wealthy family's disapproval. But his efforts to improve his circumstances are thwarted by fate and betrayal. Chigozie Obioma evokes both Homer's Odyssey and Nigerian mythology in an unforgettable novel of love and sacrifice which also subtly serves as an allegory of African history.
"Obioma's latest novel meditates on the psychic turmoil of the downtrodden. A wrenching study of the sacrifices made for love. . . an acute narrative about the indignities of traveling as an outsider. The novel aches with Chinonso. His triumphs are rare and hard-won. Obioma compels the reader to root for him, to see the poor chicken farmer's story as an epic." - The Atlantic.
"Obioma illustrates how the traditional realistic western novel may be perfectly adapted to Igbo cosmology, in which human beings are just one of many equal competing forces in a spiritually complex universe. Only a master of literary form could manage to pull this off. An Orchestra of Minorities is more than a superb and tragic novel; it's a historical treasure." - The Boston Globe.
"Obioma's frenetically assured second novel is a spectacular artistic leap forward. His new book is a linguistically flamboyant, fast-moving, fatalistic saga. Rich in folklore and the daily colour of ordinary life juxtaposed with the spirit world resonating all around it, Obioma's morality tale triumphs." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"An intricately wrought and powerful study of a man caught in the jaws of fate. There is also a powerful political and historical message here too. This is a powerful, multifarious novel that underlines Obioma's status as one of the most exciting voices in modern African literature." - Financial Times (U.K.).

(Graywolf/MPS)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
LANNY by Max Porter
A mythical figure in an idyllic English village takes a special interest in Lanny, a precocious boy who has recently moved there with his parents. But then Lanny disappears, and as a rush to judgement ensues, the village shows its darker colors of intolerance and suspicion. A delightfully dark, stylish, and suspenseful gem of a novel from a master of the form.
"This imaginative novel starts off dreamily, picks up speed, and races to a propulsive conclusion. A guaranteed edge-of-your-seat read." - Library Journal *** starred review ***.
"What's weird and wonderful about Lanny is that it pays attention to and celebrates all the things ordinary people in an ordinary village say, finding them remarkable. But what's weirder and more wonderful is that Porter's book is far from being a genre-compliant missing-child narrative. It's slipperier and more complex. Porter has performed a remarkable metaphysical trick." - The London Review of Books (U.K.).
"A rich, twisted, gloriously cacophonous novel of village life. If Lanny hums throughout with hope and humor, the dark and the difficult are also always there." - The New York Times.
"Thrilling and bizarre. . . Lanny defies straightforward generic classification. A magically beguiling work, a triumph of artistic vision." - The Financial Times (U.K.).
"Max Porter's second novel is a fable, a collage, a dramatic chorus, a joyously stirred cauldron of words. . . Lanny is remarkable. Porter is telling stories that link the immediate crises of individual lives with ancient, ageless currents of feeling and experience. He is a writer who takes risks, and this is the way new things are made." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"Whether offering psychological and emotional finesse, vigorous social comedy or vivid vignettes of the countryside, Lanny is expertly pitched. Shimmering with the uncanny, it's a remarkable feat of literary virtuosity." - The Times (U.K.)

(Random)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE *SHORTLIST*
QUICHOTTE by Salman Rushdie
A modern Don Quixote lands in Trumpian America and finds plenty of windmills to tilt at. Just as Cervantes wrote Don Quixote to satirize the culture of his era, one of the major literary voices of our time takes the reader on a wild ride through a country on the verge of moral and spiritual collapse.
"Rushdie's rambunctious latest hurtles through surreal time and space with the author's retooled Don Quixote on a quest for love and redemption in an unloving and irredeemable U.S.A. A brilliant rendition of the cheesy, sleazy, scary pandemonium of life in modern times." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
"Splendid. . . a meditation on storytelling, memory, truth, and other hallmarks of a disappearing civilization. Rushdie is in top form, serving up a fine piece of literary satire." - Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
"An exuberantly imagined and lacerating homage. Rushdie meshes shrewd, parodic humor with intensifying suspense and pervasive sympathy. A picaresque doomsday adventure. . . Rushdie's dazzling and provocative improvisation on an essential classic has powerful resonance in this time of weaponized lies and denials." - Booklist *** starred review ***.
"This latest from Rushdie is nothing but extraordinary. Incisively outlandish. . . operates on multiple planes, with razor-sharp topicality and humor, delivering a reflective examination of the plight of marginalized personhood with veritable aplomb. Highly recommended." - Library Journal *** starred review ***.
"A glorious 21st-century riff on Cervantes’s 17th century classic. This novel can fly, it can float, it’s anecdotal, effervescent, charming, and a jolly good story to boot. We are watching a master at work." - The Sunday Times (U.K.)
"A brilliant, funny, world-encompassing wonder - a far more ambitious exercise than mere homage. As he weaves. . . his readers realize that they would happily follow Rushdie to the end of the world." - TIME Magazine.

(Viking/U.K.)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE *SHORTLIST*
10 MINUTES 38 SECONDS IN THIS STRANGE WORLD by Elif Shafak
Leila, a sex worker living on the edges of Turkish underworld society, lies dying in an Istanbul rubbish bin. In the 10 minutes and 38 seconds after her heart stops beating, her life flashes before her eyes - and ours. An extraordinary tale of a brutalized, broken, but profoundly courageous woman who retains her humanity despite a world bent on crushing her at every turn.
"A testament to Shafak's brilliance as a storyteller. . . A profound, humanizing narrative. . . By revealing layer upon layer of Leila's interior life, the novel draws a magnificently nuanced portrait of its protagonist. A piercing, unflinching look at the trauma women's minds and bodies are subjected to in a social system defined by patriarchal codes." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"Here is an object lesson in how fiction can at once entertain and enlighten. . . Not only exquisite compassion and humanity but also a vibrant evocation of a hidden Istanbul in the middle of the 20th century. In lush, rich, and lucid prose, Shafak gives voice to the invisible, the untouchable, the abused and the damaged, weaving their painful songs into a thing of beauty." - The Financial Times (U.K.).
"The novels of the Turkish writer Elif Shafak are so beguiling that it's easy to forget she is a serious activist and academic. Yet beneath the lush scene-setting and romantic storytelling, her bestselling tales about modern Turkey and Islam are strident calls to challenge fundamentalism and misogyny in the Middle East. On the face of it, there couldn't be a more depressing story. Yet Leila's tale is surprisingly uplifting. There is so much beauty in this book. And there's wisdom too. Thanks to Shafak, the voices of women like Leila will no longer be silenced." - The Times (U.K.).

(Grove/IPS)
2019 BOOKER PRIZE NOMINEE
FRANKISSSTEIN by Jeanette Winterson
It's 1816 and young Mary Shelley is crafting the story of a powerful new life form. In the present day, transgender doctor Ry falls for artificial intelligence expert Victor Stein and entrepreneur Ron Lord hopes to make his fortune with high-tech sex dolls. Meanwhile, at an Arizona cryogenics facility, dozens of the medically and legally dead are about to reawaken. . . In multiple narrative threads, Jeanette Winterson explores themes of alienation, love, science, and humanity in a dazzling tour-de-force.
"Far, far more than a reimagining of Mary Shelley’s 19th-century monsterpiece. . . It's a novel fizzing with ideas. . . seamlessly interweaves social commentary on everything from gender to the cultural hegemony to our obsessions with social media and future tech. Winterson has stitched together that rarest of beasts: a novel that is both deeply thought-provoking and provocative yet also unabashedly entertaining. . . a novel that defies conventional expectations and exists, brilliantly and defiantly, on its own terms." - The New York Times.
"Surges with inventiveness. . . Frankissstein is a book that seeks to shift our perspective on humanity and the purpose of being human in the most darkly entertaining way. Gloriously well observed." - The Observer (U.K.).
"A riotous reimagining with an energy and passion all of its own that reanimates Frankenstein as a cautionary tale for our contemporary moment. While the story has a gripping momentum of its own, it also absolutely fizzes with ideas." - The Financial Times (U.K.).
"A dazzlingly intelligent meditation on the responsibilities of creation, the possibilities of artificial intelligence and the implications of both transsexuality and transhumanism. Winterson's great gift as a writer is the ability to inject pure thought with such freewheeling enthusiasm and energy that ideas take on their own kind of joyous life. Frankissstein abounds with invention. . . Deeply evocative historical realism balanced by hilarious, almost bawdy set pieces. . . A work of both pleasure and profundity, robustly and skillfully structured." - The Guardian (U.K.).
"Intelligent and inventive. . . Frankissstein is very funny. There has always been a fine line between horror and high camp, and this is a boundary that Winterson gleefully exploits." - The Times (U.K.)



    The 2019 Hugo Award [presented on Sunday, August 18, 2019. - more...]

    The Hugo Awards, presented annually since 1955, are the most prestigious awards in the field of science fiction and fantasy. The Hugo Awards are voted on by members and attendees of the World Science Fiction Convention and were presented this year on Sunday, August 18, at the 77th World Science Fiction Convention in Dublin, Ireland.

    NOMINEES FOR THE 2019 HUGO AWARD: Best Science Fiction/Fantasy Novel:

  • The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal *** WINNER ***
  • Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers
  • Revenant Gun by Yoon Ha Lee
  • Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente
  • Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik
  • Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse
    The 2019 Hugo Award Nominees for Best Novel:

    (Tor/MPS)
    THE CALCULATING STARS by Mary Robinette Kowal
    2019 HUGO AWARD WINNER | 2019 NEBULA AWARD WINNER
    Veteran historical fantasist Kowal tackles an alternate history of the space race, in which a catastrophe necessitates an earlier reach for the stars in the 1950s - and the confrontation of gender barriers by aspiring astronaut Elma York. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
    "Kowal's outstanding prequel to her Hugo-winning novelette The Lady Astronaut of Mars shows the alternate history that created a mid-20th-century Mars colony. In a compelling parallel to our own history, Kowal explores a wide range of issues - including religion, grief, survivor's guilt, mental health, racism, misogyny, and globalism - without sermonising or subsuming the characters and plot. Elma's struggles with her own prejudices and relationships, including her relationship with herself, provide a captivating human center to the apocalyptic background. Readers will thrill to the story of this 'lady astronaut' and eagerly anticipate the promised sequels." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "When a program invites women to take the same astronaut training as men, Elma York won't let anything - not family, history, or the attitudes of men regarding the proper place for women - stand in her way. A fast-forward thrill ride, Hugo Award winner Kowal's exciting alternate history, the first in a duology, highlights the space race and the sexism of the time. Readers will be hooked!" - Library Journal.
    "Kowal strikes a fine balance of integrating historical accuracy - including mid-twentieth-century sexism, racism, and technology - with speculative storytelling. Readers will root for Elma as she breaks barriers and calculates lifesaving equations, all while dealing with sometimes-crippling anxiety." - Booklist.

    (Harper Voyager)
    RECORD OF A SPACEBORN FEW by Becky Chambers
    2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    Hundreds of years ago, the last humans on Earth boarded the Exodus Fleet in search of a new home among the stars. After centuries spent wandering empty space, their descendants were eventually accepted by the well-established species that govern the Milky Way. But that was long ago. Today, the Exodus Fleet is a living relic - those who remain are left to ponder their own lives and futures: What is the purpose of a ship that has reached its destination? Why remain in space when there are habitable worlds available to live? What is the price of sustaining their carefully balanced way of life - and is it worth saving at all?
    "Multiple narrators and plot lines converge thematically into an intensely powerful and multifaceted meditation on time, history, change, and memory, leavened with a welcome touch of humor. The characters are distinct and lovable, each shedding light on a different facet of the Fleet. Chambers uses the interconnections inevitable in such a small society to provide moments of both horrific pain and soaring grace, and to make it clear that those things are inextricably intermingled. This is a superb work from one of the genre's rising stars." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Chambers has created a thoughtful, just society, but one populated by flawed characters. Human decisions can lead to terrible consequences, and all Chambers' characters are complex and fully-realized. Those characters allow us to view aspects of a 'spaceborn' society that are usually erased by space opera's traditionally masculine focus. Chambers' thoughtful, measured work offers space opera the depth and complexity it so often lacks. Her work is profound, engaging, and beautifully written." - New York Journal of Books.
    "This series is a rare gem within the sci-fi genre. Chambers' writing pulls you in, making it impossible not to imagine living in her brilliantly crafted universe." - Pomegranate Magazine.

    (Solaris/Simon & Schuster)
    REVENANT GUN by Yoon Ha Lee
    2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    This third and final novel in the Machineries of Empire trilogy brings Yoon Ha Lee's epic of interstellar warfare, politics, intrigue, and arcane technology to a shattering conclusion. [The preceding volumes are Ninefox Gambit and Raven Stratagem.] Lee combines riveting space opera action with dazzling, imaginative worldbuilding to stunning effect. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
    "Lee concludes his brilliant Machineries of Empire trilogy. Lee's highly imaginative creation is a triumph." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Yoon Ha Lee stuck the landing, and in doing so cemented that the Machineries of Empire series is one of the most ambitious and rewarding science fiction series in print. Lee relentlessly reminds us that war is a self-sustaining state, and that the suffering it produces is its intended product." - Strange Horizons
    "A fast, gripping story. . . Its shifting viewpoints - all seeing some part of the picture, none with a complete view or good insight into other people's motivations – and potential for betrayals make it feel complex and demanding. At base, though, it's a thriller crossed with a story about learning to live with consequences you didn't choose. This is excellent space opera, and I wish there were more like it." - Locus Magazine.
    "What am I going to do with my life now that this series is over? I suppose I'm left with no choice but to read everything else Yoon Ha Lee ever writes. This series is heart-wrenchingly wonderful. I can't recommend it enough." - The Illustrated Page.

    (Saga/Simon & Schuster)
    SPACE OPERA by Catherynne M. Valente
    2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST
    The great galactic civilizations gather for the Metagalactic Grand Prix - part gladiatorial contest, part beauty pageant, part concert extravaganza, and part continuation of the wars of the past. Now, for the first time, humans from Earth will compete - and their performance will determine Earth's right to exist.
    "One of the funniest books that I've ever read... But the real selling point is Valente's elaborate prose, dense with description and metaphors. Each of Valente's sentences could be an entire story, and I found myself engrossed in each one, visualizing her chaotic, bizarre, and delightful universe. I enjoyed every minute I spent reading Space Opera." - The Verge.
    "Although her comedic talents are reminiscent of Douglas Adams at his best, Valente's palette is far larger. The ability to fluidly tie real-world tragedy together with psychedelic hilarity is perhaps Space Opera's most impressive attribute. It takes confidence, skill and talent to craft a tragic disco ball metaphor, and Valente has all three in spades." - BookPage *** starred review ***.
    "There are really no words to describe Space Opera. I can say that it's a wicked-fast read (if you can handle the whiplash) and enjoyable at speeds unsafe for upright mammals. In between it's all big ideas written in glitter. It's surprising tenderness on a galactic scale. It's about loneliness and nerdliness and acceptance and making fun of the old, frowsy powers that be. Valente offers up a universe in which the only thing of true value is rhythm." - NPR.

    (Del Rey/Random)
    SPINNING SILVER by Naomi Novik
    A BEST SCIENCE FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR: The New York Times Book Review, NPR, Time, Vox, Vulture, Paste, Bustle, Library Journal
    2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    Miryem comes from a family of moneylenders, but her compassionate father's inability to collect his debts has left his family on the edge of poverty - until Miryem takes matters into her own hands. Hardening her heart, Miryem sets out to claim what is owed and soon gains a reputation for being able to turn silver into gold. But when her talents come to the attention of a fairy-King, she finds the fate of her world may depend on her. Naomi Novik, the acclaimed author of Uprooted, draws readers deep into a glittering realm of fantasy, wonder and terror.
    "This gorgeous, complex, and magical novel, grounded in Germanic, Russian, and Jewish folklore but richly overlaid with a cohesive, creative story of its own, rises well above a mere modern re-imagining of classic tales. Novik probes the edges between the everyday and the extraordinary, balancing moods of wonder and of inevitability. Her work inspires deep musings about love, wealth, and commitment, and embodies the best of the timeless fairy-tale aesthetic. Readers will be sad to walk away from its deeply immersive setting. This is the kind of book that one might wish to inhabit forever." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "A perfect tale. . . This book is about the determination and quiet competence of women doing remarkable things without knowing first that they can do them. A big and meaty novel, rich in both ideas and people, with the vastness of Tolkien and the empathy and joy in daily life of Le Guin." — The New York Times.
    "In spare prose of great clarity Novik weaves in and out of multiple first-person narratives exploring human and alien social structures and ethnic prejudices, fathers and daughters, damaged relationships and hidden agendas, wringing unexpected consequences from seemingly simple choices. A medieval fable blossoms into a thoughtful, emotionally complex, absorbing drama that stands confidently on its own merits." — Kirkus Reviews.
    "Novik addresses weighty questions of power, choice, prejudice, beauty, and identity with aplomb. Echoes of the Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale as well as Greek and Slavic myths are transformed through Novik's skill. VERDICT: This masterly, immersive high fantasy tale is grounded in real-world challenges and opportunities for growth. Highly recommended." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.

    (Gallery/Simon & Schuster)
    TRAIL OF LIGHTNING by Rebecca Roanhorse
    2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
    While most of the world has drowned beneath the sudden rising waters of a climate apocalypse, Dinétah (formerly the Navajo reservation) has been reborn. The gods and heroes of legend walk the land, but so do monsters. Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last best hope. Rebecca Roanhorse is an exciting new voice in speculative fiction, and her skilful weaving of Navajo mythology into her debut novel makes for a truly fascinating and unique read.
    "It takes a special talent to devise an apocalypse that feels original. Rebecca Roanhorse meets the challenge head-on. Smartly paced, with character development and action sequences expertly interspersed. The beginning of a longer saga, Trail of Lightning is a highly satisfying reading experience all on its own. Roanhorse possesses a sure hand and a singular vision, and she establishes her credentials as a novelist with this ambitious, exciting and well-executed first book." - The San Francisco Chronicle.
    "Vividly depicts Navajo land, legends, and culture in a marvelous fantasy debut. . . Roanhorse unspools a fascinating narrative of colorful magic in a world made otherwise bleak by both natural and man-made circumstances. The monster-hunting plot nearly takes a back seat to Maggie's challenging journey of working through personal and cultural trauma. A fresh take on the tale of the emotionally and spiritually wounded hero who faces down increasing evil to make the world better. This rich tale from a strong Native American voice is recommended for all fantasy audiences." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
    "Roanhorse's sharp prose vividly builds a reborn Navajo universe filled with magic and flawed protagonists who are striving to live beyond their presumed destinies. VERDICT: This exciting postapocalyptic debut, with its heady combination of smartly drawn characters, Wild West feel, and twisty plot, is a must-read." - Library Journal *** starred review ***.
    "Delightful. . . I loved the worldbuilding. After decades of reading genre futures in which black and brown people don't exist, it's deeply satisfying to find fiction in which histories of genocide actually equip them to survive disasters." - The New York Times.



The 2019 Women's Prize for Fiction
The Women's Prize for Fiction is the UK's most prestigious annual book award celebrating & honouring women's fiction. Founded in 1996, the Prize was set up to celebrate originality, accessibility & excellence in writing by women and to connect world-class writers with readers everywhere.
[more...]


The 2019 longlist for the Women's Prize for Fiction
  • The 2019 shortlist (best 6 titles) was announced Monday, April 29, 2019.
    • THE SILENCE OF THE GIRLS by Pat Barker
    • MY SISTER, THE SERIAL KILLER by Oyinkan Braithwaite
    • MILKMAN by Anna Burns
    • ORDINARY PEOPLE by Diana Evans
    • AN AMERICAN MARRIAGE by Tayari Jones [ WINNER! ]
    • CIRCE by Madeline Miller
  • The 2019 longlist (best 16 novels of the year) was announced Monday, March 4, 2019.
    • THE SILENCE OF THE GIRLS by Pat Barker
    • REMEMBERED by Yvonne Battle-Felton
    • MY SISTER, THE SERIAL KILLER by Oyinkan Braithwaite
    • THE PISCES by Melissa Broder
    • MILKMAN by Anna Burns
    • FRESHWATER by Akwaeke Emezi
    • ORDINARY PEOPLE by Diana Evans
    • SWAN SONG by Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott
    • AN AMERICAN MARRIAGE by Tayari Jones
    • NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
    • BOTTLED GOODS by Sophie van Llewyn
    • LOST CHILDREN ARCHIVE by Valeria Luiselli
    • PRAISE SONG FOR THE BUTTERFLIES by Bernice L. McFadden
    • CIRCE by Madeline Miller
    • GHOST WALL by Sarah Moss
    • NORMAL PEOPLE by Sally Rooney
  • The winner of the 2019 Women's Prize for Fiction was announced Wednesday, June 5, 2019

    (Algonquin/Workman)
    THE WINNER OF THE 2019 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION
    AN AMERICAN MARRIAGE by Tayari Jones
    Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime he didn't commit. A profoundly insightful look into the hearts and minds of people both bound and separated by forces beyond their control.
    "Wise and compassionate. . . It is beautifully written, with many allusions to black music and culture - including the everyday poetry of the African-American community that begs to be heard. It also warns us to awaken our compassion and empathy. This can be you, the story whispers. Forget that at your peril." - The New York Times
    "Compelling. . . intimate and introspective: a story about the unpredictable ways love ferments in the airless conditions of forced separation. Each character speaks directly to us." - The Washington Post
    "Jones's exploration is a breathtaking look at who and what can be complicit in the breakdown of a marriage. Quietly powerful. . . It becomes head-spinning how Jones upends all expectations, flipping the reader's perceptions and offering unexpected moments of clarity." - The Atlantic.
    "Peopled by vividly realized, individual characters and driven by interpersonal drama, but also very much about being black in contemporary America. This is, at its heart, a love story, but a love story warped by racial injustice. And, in it, Jones suggests that racial injustice haunts the African-American story. Subtle, well-crafted, and powerful." - Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***



    • The 2019 Man Booker International Prize
      Awarded annually for a single work of fiction that has been translated into English. Underlining the importance of translation, the £50,000 prize is divided equally between the author and the translator.
    • The longlist was announced on March 13, 2019
    • The shortlist was announced on April 9, 2019.
    • The winner was announced on Tuesday, May 21, 2019.
    • Beginning June 1, 2019, the Man International Man Booker Prize and the Man Booker Prize will revert to the names International Booker Prize and Booker Prize. The name of the Prizes' new sponsor, Crankstart, will not be included in the name of either Prize.
      [more...]

      THE 2019 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE SHORTLIST:

      *** WINNER ***

      • Celestial Bodies by Jokha Alharthi (Arabic/Omani), translated by Marilyn Booth (Sandstone Press/Dufour Editions) *** WINNER ***
      • The Years by Annie Ernaux (French), translated by Alison L. Strayer (Seven Stories Press/Random)
      • The Pine Islands by Marion Poschmann (German), translated by Jen Calleja (Profile Books, Serpent's Tail)
      • Drive Your Plow Over The Bones Of The Dead by Olga Tokarczuk (Polish), translated by Antonia Lloyd-Jones (Riverhead/Random)
      • The Shape of the Ruins by Juan Gabriel Vásquez (Spanish/Colombian), translated by Anne McLean (Riverhead/Random)
      • The Remainder by Alia Trabucco Zerán (Spanish/Chilean and Italian), translated by Sophie Hughes (Coffee House Press)
    • Winner of the 2019 Man Booker International Prize [presented Tuesday, May 21, 2019 - more...]

      (Sandstone/Dufour)
      CELESTIAL BODIES by Jokha Alharthi | Translated by Marilyn Booth
      WINNER OF THE 2019 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE
      The very first winner of the International Booker Prize originally written in Arabic. Three sisters and their families in the Oman village of al-Awafi witness their country evolve from a traditional, slave-owning society slowly redefining itself after the colonial era, to the crossroads of its complex oil-producing present. Tautly and elegantly structured, Celestial Bodies is a coiled spring of a novel, telling of Oman's coming-of-age through the prism of one family's losses and loves.
      "A book to win over the head and the heart in equal measure. Its delicate artistry draws us into a richly imagined community, opening out to tackle profound questions of time and mortality." — Man Booker International Prize Judging Panel.
      "A beautifully achieved account of lives pulling at the edges of change. A novel that deftly undermines recurrent stereotypes about Arab language and cultures." — The Irish Times (U.K.).
      "Marks the arrival of a major literary talent. . . Celestial Bodies continually re-evaluates both present and past. And while the book doesn't tell us how things turn out, it skilfully builds suspense by creating 'Aha!' moments as characters come to better understand their pasts. Readers who can leap nimbly into its stream will certainly find themselves carried away." — The National.
      "Slavery was only outlawed in Oman in 1970 and its dark complexities affect the families at the heart of the novel. The glimpses into a culture relatively little known in the West are fascinating." — The Guardian (U.K.).



      The 2019 Nebula Awards [presented Saturday, May 18, 2019 - more...]

      The Nebula Awards are voted on by members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Founded in 1965 by Damon Knight, the SFFWA has over 1,500 writers as members, among them many of the leading authors of science fiction and fantasy. The Nebula Awards were presented this year on Saturday, May 18, at the 54th Nebula Conference in Los Angeles.

      NOMINEES FOR THE 2019 NEBULA AWARD: Best Science Fiction/Fantasy Novel:

    • The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal *** WINNER ***
    • The Poppy War by R. F. Kuang
    • Blackfish City by Sam J. Miller
    • Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik
    • Witchmark by C. L. Polk
    • Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse
      The 2019 Nebula Nominees for Best Novel

      (Tor/MPS)
      THE CALCULATING STARS by Mary Robinette Kowal
      WINNER OF THE 2019 HUGO AWARD | WINNER OF THE 2019 NEBULA AWARD
      Veteran historical fantasist Kowal tackles an alternate history of the space race, in which a catastrophe necessitates an earlier reach for the stars in the 1950s - and the confrontation of gender barriers by aspiring astronaut Elma York. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
      "Kowal's outstanding prequel to her Hugo-winning novelette The Lady Astronaut of Mars shows the alternate history that created a mid-20th-century Mars colony. In a compelling parallel to our own history, Kowal explores a wide range of issues - including religion, grief, survivor's guilt, mental health, racism, misogyny, and globalism - without sermonising or subsuming the characters and plot. Elma's struggles with her own prejudices and relationships, including her relationship with herself, provide a captivating human center to the apocalyptic background. Readers will thrill to the story of this 'lady astronaut' and eagerly anticipate the promised sequels." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
      "When a program invites women to take the same astronaut training as men, Elma York won't let anything - not family, history, or the attitudes of men regarding the proper place for women - stand in her way. A fast-forward thrill ride, Hugo Award winner Kowal's exciting alternate history, the first in a duology, highlights the space race and the sexism of the time. Readers will be hooked!" - Library Journal.
      "Kowal strikes a fine balance of integrating historical accuracy - including mid-twentieth-century sexism, racism, and technology - with speculative storytelling. Readers will root for Elma as she breaks barriers and calculates lifesaving equations, all while dealing with sometimes-crippling anxiety." - Booklist.

      (Harper Voyager)
      THE POPPY WAR by R. F. Kuang
      A BEST SCIENCE FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR: Library Journal, Vulture, Entropy, Bustle
      2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
      When Lin gains admittance to the Empire's top military academy, she discovers that despite her martial arts prowress and academic excellence, her peasant background marks her as a target. The odds seem stacked against her until Lin finds she has a gift for shamanism. R. F. Kuang - a brilliantly imaginative talent - makes her exciting debut with this epic military fantasy, set in an alternate world of historical China.
      "An ambitious fantasy re-imagining of Asian history populated by martial artists, philosopher-generals, and gods. Kuang highlights the horrors of war, especially the moral and emotional toll on combatants who employ scorched-earth strategies. The novel does not allow its characters to slough off their culpability for channeling godly powers. Readers may empathize with Rin's desire for vengeance, but any thrill at her success is matched by horror at its costs. This is a strong and dramatic launch to Kuang's career." — Publishers Weekly.
      "The narrative is an impactful, impressive symphony of words that grant life to this incredible morality tale. Setting the stage for an epic fantasy is an understandably enormous undertaking, but Kuang does an exceptional job of world and character building." — RT Book Reviews : Top Pick.
      "The humor is a bitter laugh, the lessons bruising. . . The book starts as an epic bildungsroman, and just when you think it can't get any darker, it does. Kuang pulls from East Asian history, including the brutality of the Second Sino-Japanese war, to weave a wholly unique experience." — The Washington Post: Best Science Fiction Novels.
      "Immediate, visceral and wrenching, pulling on the reader's sense of disgust and anger. The 'war is hell' trope plays out solemnly and intimately here, leaving no character untouched. Thank goodness we have Rin to lead us through it. Her tenacity, stubbornness and insecurity are instantly sympathetic and Kuang's attention to Rin's feelings opens up oceans of emotional depth. There's a definite weight to Rin's conflicting choices that only builds as the suspenseful final act plays out." — Bookpage *** starred review ***.

      (Ecco/Harper)
      BLACKFISH CITY by Sam Miller
      2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
      After the climate wars, a floating city is constructed in the Arctic Circle, a remarkable feat of mechanical and social engineering, complete with geothermal heating and sustainable energy. But decay has set in: the contradictions of incredible wealth alongside direst poverty are spawning unrest, and a new disease is ravaging the population. A remarkably urgent novel about political corruption, organized crime, technology run amok, the consequences of climate change, gender identity, and the unifying power of human connection.
      "An ambitious, imaginative, and big-hearted dystopian ensemble story that's by turns elegiac and angry. Miller has crafted a thriller that unflinchingly examines the ills of urban capitalism. The floating city of Qaanaaq is a beautiful and brutal character in its own right, rendered in poetic interludes." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
      "Qaanaaq is vividly brought to life in all its squalid glory, and Miller excels at depicting a metropolis bursting at the seams and populated by both refugees and the elite. Blackfish City is a compelling dystopian thriller." - The Guardian (U.K.)
      "An eco-punk thriller with startling implications for how climate change, technology, and the political machinations of the mega-rich could dramatically alter our future. Sam J. Miller has proven himself a force to be reckoned with. Fascinating. . . A science fantasy that is truly remarkable in scope." - B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy.
      "An urgent tale imploring us to look at the ties between technology, race, gender and class privilege. . . Surprisingly heartwarming. . . Ultimately, Blackfish is a book about power structures and the way that privilege is built on the backs of the disenfranchised - wrapped in an action-packed science fiction thriller." - The Washington Post

      (Del Rey/Random)
      SPINNING SILVER by Naomi Novik
      A BEST SCIENCE FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR: The New York Times Book Review, NPR, Time, Vox, Vulture, Paste, Bustle, Library Journal
      2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
      Miryem comes from a family of moneylenders, but her compassionate father's inability to collect his debts has left his family on the edge of poverty - until Miryem takes matters into her own hands. Hardening her heart, Miryem sets out to claim what is owed and soon gains a reputation for being able to turn silver into gold. But when her talents come to the attention of a fairy-King, she finds the fate of her world may depend on her. Naomi Novik, the acclaimed author of Uprooted, draws readers deep into a glittering realm of fantasy, wonder and terror.
      "This gorgeous, complex, and magical novel, grounded in Germanic, Russian, and Jewish folklore but richly overlaid with a cohesive, creative story of its own, rises well above a mere modern re-imagining of classic tales. Novik probes the edges between the everyday and the extraordinary, balancing moods of wonder and of inevitability. Her work inspires deep musings about love, wealth, and commitment, and embodies the best of the timeless fairy-tale aesthetic. Readers will be sad to walk away from its deeply immersive setting. This is the kind of book that one might wish to inhabit forever." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
      "A perfect tale. . . This book is about the determination and quiet competence of women doing remarkable things without knowing first that they can do them. A big and meaty novel, rich in both ideas and people, with the vastness of Tolkien and the empathy and joy in daily life of Le Guin." — The New York Times.
      "In spare prose of great clarity Novik weaves in and out of multiple first-person narratives exploring human and alien social structures and ethnic prejudices, fathers and daughters, damaged relationships and hidden agendas, wringing unexpected consequences from seemingly simple choices. A medieval fable blossoms into a thoughtful, emotionally complex, absorbing drama that stands confidently on its own merits." — Kirkus Reviews.
      "Novik addresses weighty questions of power, choice, prejudice, beauty, and identity with aplomb. Echoes of the Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale as well as Greek and Slavic myths are transformed through Novik's skill. VERDICT: This masterly, immersive high fantasy tale is grounded in real-world challenges and opportunities for growth. Highly recommended." — Library Journal *** starred review ***.

      (Tor/MPS)
      WITCHMARK by C. L. Polk
      2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
      In a world reminiscent of Edwardian England in the shadow of a World War, cabals of noble families use their unique magical gifts to control the fates of nations, while one young man with the secret gift of healing seeks only to live a life of his own. An exceptional debut full of thrills, atmosphere, lost souls, and more than a touch of romance.
      "Polk's stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century in an England-like land recovering from a WWI-like war, blends taut mystery, exciting political intrigue, and inventive fantasy. The final revelations are impossible to see coming and prove that Polk is a writer to watch." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
      "Many disparate elements are expertly woven together to make this debut a crackler, with layers like a nesting doll and just as delightful to discover. There's a will-he-or-won't-he romance, mages, wizards, and political intrigue, all wrapped up in the feeling of a historical mystery. Polk has created an amazing new world with hints of Edwardian glamour, sizzling secrets, and forbidden love that crescendos to a cinematic finish. Witchmark is a can't-miss debut that will enchant readers." - Booklist *** starred review ***.
      "Thoroughly charming and deftly paced. . . opening up intriguing possibilities for a sequel." - The New York Times, (Best New Fantasy Novels)
      "A startlingly beautiful fantasy debut that is both magical conspiracy thriller and supernatural love story... The increasing darkness of Witchmark is beautifully modulated, funneling the reader closer to a chilling, utterly fantastic final reveal." - BookPage *** starred review ***.

      (Gallery/Simon & Schuster)
      TRAIL OF LIGHTNING by Rebecca Roanhorse
      2019 HUGO AWARD FINALIST | 2019 NEBULA AWARD FINALIST
      While most of the world has drowned beneath the sudden rising waters of a climate apocalypse, Dinétah (formerly the Navajo reservation) has been reborn. The gods and heroes of legend walk the land, but so do monsters. Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last best hope. Rebecca Roanhorse is an exciting new voice in speculative fiction, and her skilful weaving of Navajo mythology into her debut novel makes for a truly fascinating and unique read.
      "It takes a special talent to devise an apocalypse that feels original. Rebecca Roanhorse meets the challenge head-on. Smartly paced, with character development and action sequences expertly interspersed. The beginning of a longer saga, Trail of Lightning is a highly satisfying reading experience all on its own. Roanhorse possesses a sure hand and a singular vision, and she establishes her credentials as a novelist with this ambitious, exciting and well-executed first book." - The San Francisco Chronicle.
      "Vividly depicts Navajo land, legends, and culture in a marvelous fantasy debut. . . Roanhorse unspools a fascinating narrative of colorful magic in a world made otherwise bleak by both natural and man-made circumstances. The monster-hunting plot nearly takes a back seat to Maggie's challenging journey of working through personal and cultural trauma. A fresh take on the tale of the emotionally and spiritually wounded hero who faces down increasing evil to make the world better. This rich tale from a strong Native American voice is recommended for all fantasy audiences." - Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
      "Roanhorse's sharp prose vividly builds a reborn Navajo universe filled with magic and flawed protagonists who are striving to live beyond their presumed destinies. VERDICT: This exciting postapocalyptic debut, with its heady combination of smartly drawn characters, Wild West feel, and twisty plot, is a must-read." - Library Journal *** starred review ***.
      "Delightful. . . I loved the worldbuilding. After decades of reading genre futures in which black and brown people don't exist, it's deeply satisfying to find fiction in which histories of genocide actually equip them to survive disasters." - The New York Times.



      The 2019 Edgar Award [presented April 26, 2019 - more...]

      2019 EDGAR AWARD NOMINEES: Best Mystery Novel:

    • The Liar's Girl by Catherine Ryan Howard
    • House Witness by Mike Lawson
    • A Gambler's Jury by Victor Methos
    • Down the River Unto the Sea by Walter Mosley *** WINNER ***
    • Only to Sleep by Lawrence Osborne
    • A Treacherous Curse by Deanna Raybourn
      The 2019 Edgar Award Winners:

    • 2019 BEST MYSTERY / SUSPENSE NOVEL: DOWN THE RIVER UNTO THE SEA by Walter Mosley

      (Mulholland/Hachette)
      WINNER OF THE 2019 EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL
      DOWN THE RIVER UNTO THE SEA by Walter Mosley
      Acclaimed mystery author Walter Mosley introduces a new main character in this Edgar-Award-winning gem. Joe King Oliver, a framed ex-New York City police detective turned private eye, takes on the case of a black activist journalist accused of a double murder. Oliver's path leads him to hired killers and crooked cops, drug addicts and prostitutes, and a host of men, women and children - those whose lives have been shattered by the law and those who are supposed to uphold it.
      "It's hard not to simply quote all the great lines. There are so many of them. You want to share the pleasures of Mosley's jazz-inflected dialogue and the moody, descriptive passages reminiscent of Raymond Chandler at his best. Down the River Unto the Sea is as gorgeous a novel as anything Mosley's ever written. And with Joe King Oliver I'm betting, and hoping, he's given us a character we haven't see the last of." — The Washington Post.
      "A wild ride that delivers hard-boiled satisfaction while toying with our prejudices and preconceptions. The darker and uglier the story gets, the more Joe King Oliver comes alive. . . Despite its serious subject matter, Down the River Unto the Sea is an optimistic noir. A fitting work for a world riddled with dark contradictions." — The Los Angeles Times.
      "Mosley shakes things up, crafting a story set squarely in the time of Black Lives Matter. Urgent in its plotting and carefully observed in the behaviors and the voices of its supporting cast. . . Mosley makes it all look simple, creating in Joe King Oliver another fascinatingly flawed detective brimming with potential." — The San Francisco Chronicle.
      "Mosley rekindles the remarkable energy that drove the early Easy Rawlins novels. And he has created a new hero in Joe King Oliver with the depth and vulnerability to sustain what readers will hope becomes a new series. Mosley writes with great power here about themes that have permeated his work: institutional racism, political corruption, and the ways that both of these issues affect not only society at large but also the inner lives of individual men and women. It's the perfect moment for Mosley to unveil an exciting new hero and a series set in the present and confronting the issues that drive today's headlines." — Booklist *** starred review ***.

    • 2019 BEST FIRST NOVEL: BEARSKIN by James A. McLaughlin

      (Ecco/Harper)
      WINNER OF THE 2019 EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FIRST NOVEL
      BEARSKIN by James A. McLaughlin
      Rice Moore, a caretaker for a remote forest preserve in Virginia, cherishes a solitary life that enables him to hide from the Mexican drug cartels he betrayed back in Arizona. But when Rice finds the carcass of a bear killed on the grounds, his quiet life is upended.
      "As taut as a crossbow and as sharp as an arrowhead, McLaughlin's debut unfolds in the Appalachian wilderness of Virginia, a landscape whose heart of darkness pulses viscerally through its characters. The novel's denouement, a smoothly orchestrated confluence of the greater and lesser subplots, plays out against a tempest-tossed natural setting whose intrinsic beauty and roughness provide the perfect context for the story's volatile events. This is a thrilling, thoroughly satisfying debut." — Publishers Weekly *** starred review ***.
      "A violent, compelling story that uses its milieu to incredible effect. Told in spare prose and portraying the authentic mechanics of hunting, combat, and psychological defense, the novel dares the reader to root for this damaged antihero but convinces us that he's worth it. An intense, visceral debut." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
      "Part thriller, part crime novel, part dreamscape, James A. McLaughlin's Bearskin refuses to be contained. Wonderfully lucid prose starkly conveys Rice's descent into a wild existence. Smart and sophisticated, with animals both wild and domestic acting as metaphors, Bearskin is a gritty, down-home tale told with brute force. Rice is a memorable, reluctant hero for both his community and the animals in his charge." — BookPage *** starred review ***.
      "Gruesomely gorgeous. McLaughlin writes about the natural world with a casual lyricism and un-self-conscious joy. Remarkable. . . The kind of writing that makes me shiver." — The New York Times.
      "A powerful and often profound debut, Bearskin constructs a riveting narrative, set within a natural world that, should it vanish, McLaughlin suggests, might take part of us with it." — USA Today.



      The 2019 Pulitzer Prizes [presented April 15, 2019 - more...]

    • FICTION:

      (Norton)
      WINNER OF THE 2019 PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION
      A 2018 MAN BOOKER PRIZE FINALIST

      THE OVERSTORY by Richard Powers
      Nine remarkable strangers are summoned in different ways for an ultimate, brutal stand to save the continent's few remaining acres of virgin forest. Richard Powers delivers a sweeping, impassioned novel of activism and resistance that is also a stunning homage to the natural world - a world alongside ours, and almost invisible to us. This is the story of a handful of people who learn how to see that world and who are drawn up into its unfolding catastrophe.
      "This ambitious novel soars up through the canopy of American literature and remakes the landscape of environmental fiction." — The Washington Post.
      "An extraordinary novel. . . an astonishing performance. I found, while reading, that some of what was happening to his characters passed into my conscience, like alcohol into the bloodstream, and left a feeling behind of grief or guilt, even after I put the book down." — The Guardian (U.K.).
      "A masterpiece of operatic proportions, involving nine central characters and more than half a century of American life. A magnificent achievement: a novel that is, by turns, both optimistic and fatalistic, idealistic without being naive." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
      "A magnificent saga! Powers' sylvan tour de force is alive with gorgeous descriptions; continually surprising, often heartbreaking characters; complex suspense; unflinching scrutiny of pain; celebration of creativity and connection; and informed and expressive awe over the planet's life force and its countless and miraculous manifestations." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
      "A monumental novel that accomplishes what few living writers from either camp, art or science, could attempt. Using the tools of story, Powers pulls readers heart-first into a perspective so much longer-lived and more subtly developed than the human purview that we gain glimpses of a vast, primordial sensibility, while watching our own kind get whittled down to size. . . The descriptions of this deeply animate place stand with any prose I've ever read. I hesitate to tell more, and spoil the immense effort Powers invests in getting us into that primal forest to bear witness." — The New York Times.

    • GENERAL NON-FICTION:

      (FSG/Macmillan)
      WINNER OF THE 2019 PULITZER PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION
      AMITY AND PROSPERITY: One Family and the Fracturing of America by Eliza Griswold
      When farm animals, pets, and then children begin to sicken and die in a small Appalachian town, single mother Stacey Haney goes up against the corporate forces behind the natural gas fracking boom. Drawing on seven years of immersive reporting, prizewinning poet and journalist Eliza Griswold reveals what happens when an imperiled town faces a crisis, and a family wagers everything on an improbable quest for justice.
      "Griswold painstakingly builds the narrative amid its historical and social context. Griswold's brilliant choice is to focus tightly on a small group of residents and let the details of their predicament speak for themselves. Thoroughly reported and tightly paced, Amity and Prosperity is an essential document of the region's latest go-round with the riches underfoot." — The Los Angeles Review of Books.
      "Griswold's empathetic yet analytical account of Stacey Haney's indefatigable role as advocate for justice is a thorough and thoroughly blood-pressure-raising account of the greed and fraud embedded in the environmentally ruinous natural-gas industry. As honest and unvarnished an account of the human cost of corporate corruption as one will find." — Booklist *** starred review ***.
      "Her impressive research notwithstanding, Amity and Prosperity is at heart a David and Goliath story fit for the movies. It has everything but a happy ending: a bucolic setting concealing fortune and danger; poor but proud locals; tough, reluctant victim-heroes; grisly scenes of animal die-off; and courtroom drama as a tenacious husband-wife legal team takes on the industry and the state. A valuable, discomforting book." — The New York Times.

    • HISTORY:

      (Simon & Schuster)

      10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
      WINNER OF THE 2019 PULITZER PRIZE FOR HISTORY
      A NEW YORK TIMES BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR

      FREDERICK DOUGLASS: Prophet of Freedom David W. Blight
      The most important African American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era. There has not been a major biography of Douglass in a quarter century. Now David W. Blight affords this major American prophet and reformer the distinguished biography he deserves. With the lucid prose and in-depth research that have been a hallmark of his long and distinguished career, the acclaimed historian has drawn on new information few other biographers have been able to access. The result is a portrait that is likely to stand as the definitive account for years to come.
      "A monumental work about a monumental figure. Cinematic and deeply engaging. . . a tour de force of storytelling. Blight isn't looking to overturn our understanding of Douglass, whose courage and achievements were unequivocal, but to complicate it - a measure by which this ambitious and empathetic biography resoundingly succeeds." - The New York Times (Editors' Choice).
      "David W. Blight brilliantly captures this legendary figure and his times in one of the best biographies of recent years. Blight's portrait of Douglass is engrossing, moving, nuanced, frightening - and certainly thought-provoking." - Bookpage *** starred review ***.
      "The most comprehensive biography of Douglass ever written. Above all, Blight lets this remarkable voice speak for itself throughout the text. Douglass excelled at telling his own story (he wrote three autobiographies), and Blight does not talk over him. Blight has written a biography that will likely stand as definitive for decades to come." - The Philadelphia Inquirer.
      "Magisterial. . . David Blight has written the definitive biography of Frederick Douglass. With extraordinary detail he illuminates the complexities of Douglass's life and career and paints a powerful portrait of one of the most important American voices of the 19th century. The resulting chronicle enriches our understanding of Douglass and the challenges he faced and offers a lesson for our own troubled times." - The Boston Globe.

    • BIOGRAPHY:

      (Oxford University Press)
      WINNER OF THE 2019 PULITZER PRIZE FOR BIOGRAPHY
      WINNER OF THE 2019 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD

      THE NEW NEGRO: The Life of Alain Locke by Jeffrey C. Stewart
      In the early 20th century, a black man emerged from Philadelphia to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston that he called the "New Negro" - the African Americans whose art, literature, music, and drama would inspire black people to greatness. Jeffrey C. Stewart offers the definitive biography of the father of the Harlem Renaissance, based on primary sources of his life and on interviews with those who knew him personally.
      "Jeffrey C. Stewart's majestic biography gives Locke the attention his life deserves, but the book is more than a catalog of this philosopher and critic's achievements. Stewart also renders the tangled knot of art, sexuality and yearning for liberation that propelled Locke's work. The benefits of this book's thoroughness are manifold. A master class in how to trace the lineage of a biographical subject's ideas and predilections." — The New York Times.
      "Stewart's sprawling, magisterial labor of love comes as a reminder that a century ago, when race relations were far worse than they are now, a fiercely independent philosopher of color set down visions of black American freedom beyond economic agendas, nationalist visions, and political protest. This book draws Alain Locke out of the shadows and bestows his legacy to artists of all colors and genders seeking freedom from narrow-minded expectations and fear-mongering hypocrisy." — Book Forum *** starred review ***.
      "A magisterial biography of the prime mover of the Harlem Renaissance. This hefty, deeply researched book brilliantly doubles as a history of the philosophical debates that girded black artistic triumphs early in the 20th century. A sweeping biography that gets deep into not just the man, but the movements he supported, resisted, and inspired." — Kirkus Reviews *** starred review ***.
      "A vitally important, astonishingly well researched, exhaustive biography of the brilliant, complex, flawed, utterly fascinating man who served as the curator, intellectual champion, and guiding spirit of the Harlem Renaissance. Stewart's account of Locke's life is detailed, sometimes astoundingly so. More important, he displays a thorough grasp of the intellectual challenges Locke took on." — The Wall Street Journal.

    • POETRY:

      (Norton)
      WINNER OF THE 2019 PULITZER PRIZE FOR POETRY
      BE WITH by Forrest Gander
      Gander has been called one of our most formally restless poets, and these new poems express a characteristically tensile energy and uniquely eclectic diction. His partner of more than thirty years, the poet C. D. Wright, died unexpectedly in her sleep in 2016 and in many ways, this collection of Gander's poetry serves as both an elegy to Wright and an outpouring of Gander's grief.
      "The book's title gives away its most tragic insight. 'Be with': the phrase is stripped of its object; the beloved has been ripped from the world. Reciprocity is suddenly broken, as though one player in a game had walked off the court mid-volley. A harrowing, sometimes despairing book. . . But even in near-darkness there's light enough for a new, strange kind of love poem" — The New Yorker.
      "Reading Forrest Gander's work makes the reader feel as if she's entering a world larger than her own, one with a broader vocabulary, richer imagery, and a deeper understanding of the relationships between the ordinary and the unknowable. This is a book that opens a deeper way of seeing and being in the world, inviting us to go back to it again and again." — ZYZZYVA: A San Francisco Journal of Arts and Letters..
      "Read together, Gander's verses have a shattering, symphonic quality, but he uses poetry to locate and dislocate at once, pushing against the borders of meaning or pitching his camp where language estranges itself from sense. Gander's poems are like rich Möbius strips, entrances and exits at once, tunnels that simultaneously displace us and gather us up, drawing us into a profound human longing. There are dazzling fragments, unraveling syntax, poems that, in their ghostliness, also force us to be alert to our own fragile lives." — The New York Times


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